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Summerhill Pyramid Winery-Kelowna, BC Canada Pt. 2

Summerhill Pyramid Winery Pt 2

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all, grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is; we continue our conversation with Stephen Sipes, proprietor of Summerhill Pyramid Winery.  I’m not asking for the secret sauce here. What do you feel attributes to all of the awards that you get for your winemaking?

Yes, it’s a combination of things that we do. First of all, and most importantly, the grapes are grown organically and biodynamic. And they are we actually process the wine in a certified organic cellar as well. What does that mean by everything? What does that mean by biodynamic is a term we can use if you get a Demeter certification out of Germany, which is the highest way to get organic certification like it’s the biggest test. And everything is done by Rudolf Steiner, who is the founder of Demeter and Biodynamics, really. And he specifies when you can plant by the moon and when you harvest, and you put in making a tea from the right and grapes from last year, and everything is composted, compost, tea, there’s a lot of the things that you need to do and be done with your plant is really at the end of the day, it’s about nature and communication with man. It’s a wonderful man and nature quencher. I call it.

Going through those two processes sounds very complex in themselves, let alone having to do two of those. And yet you decided to add another element to try to raise wine to its highest form.

And we took it to another process as well. And we built a sacred geometry chamber to put the wines in for the marriage period from dosaging to going on to the shelf. So when you make sparkling wine, as most people do know, you make a base wine like any other wine, and then you put that base one in a bottle that has a stick and can handle the pressure, and you add yeast and sugar and represent it in that bottle again, and it lays on the dead yeast cells. You sell the leaves for 18 months to 15 years. And each year, depending on what kind of grapes you have it made out of, produces more of the subtle flavors and nuances that you get out of fine sparkling wine. And then you wake up the bottle by riddling it and getting the dead yeast cells out of it . And then you dosage it with a sweet little reserve because the yeast has eaten all of the sugar. So its own dry and most people can handle it that way. And then the dosage period is what we call the marriage period. And in Europe, in Germany and Spain and France, many places where they make sparkling wine, they put the bottles in a sacred geometry chamber, which in those areas is almost always a Roman arch cellar. n Spain has, I think, 30 miles of Roman cellars to house their bottles after they’ve been discharged. And we built a precision pyramid after the Great Pyramid in Egypt to several trips that I was privileged to make with Egyptologists, then John Anthony West. So we did a precision pyramid, and we put all our wines now into that pyramid, which makes them again with a tiny winery, we’re only 30,000 cases a year, and yet we win a huge amount of awards every year with our own people. Love the flavors at the organic wine, and the pyramid adds a dimension to it as well.

Well, listening to the details that you put into every single process of what you do, I can only imagine the painstaking details you went in to recreate the pyramid.

We made it out of poured concrete, which has fiberglass rebar because we didn’t want to use any ferrous metals and reorient the building back to the magnetic north. It’s oriented to True North just as the Great Pyramid is. So we followed the Great Pyramid in every respect, and we did everything with few stones because the whole pyramid there is a fuzed stone structure, very rare and magnificent in so many ways. It’s unbelievable. I have a book out called All One Era on Amazon.com, and it goes into all these details. So and our website has good details on the pyramid as well.

Somebody of about its time, boys and girls for our listener voicemail.

Hi, my name is Junie from Atlanta. And my question is, what kind of wine do you recommend for Red? You’d like to stay consistent in your cooking skills, use the same wine that you’re going to drink for dinner as the marinade.

If you’re going to drink an expensive wine for dinner, keep that in mind that you’re going to have to use it to marinate as well. Personally, I’d use two buck, Chuck, with Chuck Steak.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show, tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox. Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: AppleSpotifyGoogleDeezerStitcherTuneinBreakerCastbox.

 

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Summerhill Pyramid Winery-Kelowna, BC Canada Pt. 1

PyramidSunsetWinter

Summerhill Pyramid Winery Pt 1

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike, let’s start the adventure.

Let’s start the adventure. Our featured winery is; in today’s episode. We head to the land of hockey, maple syrup, brutally cold winters. Butter Tarts, Duncker Roos, of course. Drake, Tim Hortons. Canada’s most visited and largest organic winery, Summerhill Pyramid Winery, Stephen Cipes with a PH and the proprietor and founder of Summerhill Pyramid Winery in Kelowna, British Columbia.

Ok, enough of the kidding around. Let’s get down to the wonderful story of Summerhill Pyramid Winery. Stephen, your accomplishments would fill a New York City phone book. But let’s start back at the beginning. Where did all of this being in connection with the Earth of the land and begin?  It goes back to my childhood, really. I love growing things and being in the soil and being outdoors and climbing trees a little. As a little boy, I’ve always been an outdoor kid and I, you know, got involved in real estate developing in a way that would save the wetlands and the and the steep slopes and very involved in early in the 60s, 60s hippie, if you will, out there protesting the way people built things. I was one of the founders of why environmental rules are so strict today, why they can’t just fill in wetlands and stuff like that was my original push in New York, which was a big suburb of Manhattan. Feel like I am part of the Earth, and I wanted to get closer and brought my little family of four little boys and my wife Wendy at the time. And we came up here and bought a little vineyard, and Kelowna had to take out almost all of the vines. There were grapevines that weren’t really good for making wine. They were for table grapes and for hybrid grapes and things like that. And I went to France, bought some clones there that were making the finest sparkling wine in the world because I got an inspiration here that we had the ideal climate to make sparkling wine very exciting. You know, sparkling wine is made all over the world. But it’s most famous, of course, in Champagne. Sparkling wine is the same thing as Champagne. It’s just. Yeah, if it’s not from Champagne, it can’t be called Champagne.

That’s correct. Especially if you make it in the traditional way, which is to use the three grapes that you must use in Champagne in order for it to be called Champagne, which are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, in any given amount, you can even have a two percent Monet doesn’t matter as long as you have all three here. We don’t call it Champagne because we’re not allowed to in a strictly enforce that. But we actually won the most prestigious award in the world in France, the best sparkling wine in the world. They couldn’t believe it from a little place in an unknown wine region like Kelowna, British Columbia. Who would have thunk it? Those are the vines that you when you went to France. Yes. One of the biggest reasons is that if you have intensely flavored grapes, they will hold their flavor through the second fermentation in the bottle. And we here in the Okanagan have a very dry climate. It’s called a semi-desert. And this low rainfall as we growers keep the irrigation down off really, and we get these intensely flavored grapes that make the best wine that will hold the flavor through the second fermentation in the bottle. And that’s just been winning awards all over the world. In fact, when we first introduced our Sipes brewed in New York, where I’m from, I got rave reviews in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal. And oh gosh, it was a hit, and it was all sold out here at home because we got such great notoriety in New York.

And the awards just keep coming. I understand your home to the most awarded wine in Canada.

Yes, we also have an abundance of Riesling, and the reasoning here is extremely tasty and makes wonderful sparkling wine. And our biggest seller is the reasoning based sparkling wine called Sipes Brewed, which does have Chardonnay in it as well. But it’s the Riesling that is kind of has the high acid, which goes beautifully with almost any food, and it’s made people roll their eyes and say it’s delicious and they don’t like sparkling wine, but they love Sipes fruit. And it’s actually gotten a gold medal every year since 1992, making it the most awarded wine in Canada. In part two of our conversation with Stephen Sipes of Summerhill Pyramid Winery, we learn how the pyramid plays a part in the success of the aftermath.

It’s time, boys, and girls for our Listener voicemail.

Hi, this is Brenda from Montana, and I want to know, so how long does wine last, if you like, put the cork back in it, stick at the friend. How long will it last if you do it that way? Anyway, thanks for your information. Bye. Good question, Brenda. Well, the experts seem to agree that. Go ahead, stick the cork back in the bottle. That’s a great way to do it. Plus, it’s economical to months would be about as far as you’d want to push it.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show, tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

Sign up for our Newsletter, which includes wine and travel discounts. We also give away free swag!

For more information about Summerhill Pyramid Winery check out the links below.

BC Wine Awards

https://youtu.be/9Cvc2ocTzpk

Bioenergy Demonstration by Dr. Valerie Hunt

https://youtu.be/_AUqSRVbhC0

Summerhill Pyramid & Kekuli Gatherings

https://youtu.be/m77_En3K9Ng

In Conversation with David Suzuki

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgg2Qv5n7fk

In Conversation with Robert Bateman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN8ekQJNXtg

Robert Bateman Chieftain Gallery Opening Highlights

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CautpujP15g

Meet the Author of All One Era

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pryeulaSWrI

The All One Era

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4H80RUbwjpc

All One Era Book Promo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myX3xZ_o5dM

 

 

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Pecan Creek Winery – Muskogee, OK Pt. 3

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all, grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. We wrap up our conversation with Bob Wickizer of Pecan Creek Winery, Muskogee, Oklahoma.

OK, Bob, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty. How many labels do you have?

We actually have 20 labels. There are dry and sweet labels. And there are there’s only two that are not from grapes or products that we get locally. We started out. Everybody in the world wants cabernet sauvignon. Cab is hard to get, and frankly, it’s hard to grow here. We do grow some, and we have a limited production right now. We did win a bronze at San Francisco Chronicle for a couple of years ago. So I start getting nice source grapes from Lodi originally and now from Washington State. We make one line called Purple Martin. That’s grapes that are not local, but it’s a pretty darn good wine. And we also buy some mead from a Missouri mediary, and we add about five percent of one of our white wines to it to give it a little more acid and balance it up. And those are the only two at either end of the spectrum that we don’t source and make entirely locally. So hypothetically, Bob, if a vineyard from California ever said you couldn’t compete with what we produce here in California, what would you say?

I still do say that any idiot can make good wine from West Coast fruit. But if you want a real challenge, you want to come out here, try it. The UC Davis field book for all the pests and bugs and viruses and bacteria and molds that affect wine is about 30 pages long. And the Oklahoma State University field book is about 200 pages. We have more things to worry about here than a grape grower in California would ever even dream about in their worst nightmares. And then we have the weather. Of course, you know, it was our meteorological data of last freezes, supposedly April 15th tax date. But April twenty-sixth this year, we had twenty-five degrees for four hours. And our Vitis vinifera plants especially, we’re pushing out shoots about two, three, four inches long and they just turned brown and fell off. It was like, oh my gosh. But, you know, you never worry about a freeze, especially. And after your butt out started pushing out chutes, that’s unheard of in most grape-growing regions. So, you know, we have that, and we have ridiculously humid hot summers. So the difference between the day and nighttime temperature, it can be 30 or 40 degrees in California, nighttime. Sometimes it doesn’t cool off below 80 degrees. It’s hard for the vines to rest metabolically. That’s one of the reasons why our sugar levels are not as high as they get in California, but our acid levels tend to be very good. I personally do not like high alcohol wines, anyway. I prefer 12 to 13, maybe 13, four percent above. Thankfully, we can’t grow alcohol in here, so we take what we can get. We’re having fun, and we’re kind of the contrarian’s. My partner, Dr. Wilkinson, and our vineyard manager Gary Ketchum, are just fabulous at managing the vineyard.

And finally, Bob, because you take such great pride in your winery, you really encourage people to test their local wineries, don’t you?

You know, if you believe in it and local business, then, you know, don’t buy exclusive cheapo wine at the big, big-box and grocery stores come out to your local winery and enjoy something that’s truly local. Ours is grown here. It’s made here. It’s as local as it gets. It cost a little more. But on the other hand, we tend to not use any chemicals or additives. I can tell you that our grapes and the soil around our grapes have never seen a drop of Roundup. Ever understand that most California wines, even the organic ones test with residues in them. And we don’t use Mega Purple and the stuff that the big wineries use, and we tend to just take our time. And so our whites may take six months to come out, and our reds never see the light of a bottle for a year to four years. Let time do what time does best that we’re not in a hurry to push stuff out the door for cash flow reasons. We’re trying to make darn good wine that’s respectable, and that reflects the characteristics of our region. The website is Pecan Creek Winery.com I think Facebook. You just look up Pecan Creek Winery. And you’ll find us, and we’re shipping through VINOSHIPPER, we shipped to 40 states and California will be on board soon as number forty-one.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Pecan Creek Winery – Muskogee, OK Pt. 2

Pecan Creek Winery-Muskogee, OK.

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. Our featured winery is, we continue our conversation with Bob Wickizer owner operator of Pecan Creek Winery in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

How do we get to your place? Well, first of all, you come down, I think one of the bumpiest roads on the planet, outside of the roads in the rainforest in Costa Rica. Once you’ve managed to traverse three or four miles of you, first see the vineyard on my partner’s ranch. And a lot of people want to turn in there. But there are signs that say wineries another mile. We have about two or three hundred grapevines, cab and Tempranillo around the winery. But the big vineyards down the road, the winery is in a 5000 square foot converted garage. I proudly tell the story of the origin of the word and the wine industry, Garagistes, it’s a French or Italian word literally means someone who works in a garage like a mechanic. Then the big wineries picked it up to disparage the up and coming young wine makers who were, you know, they couldn’t afford the Chateau and Napa or wherever. So they get a car garage, start making wine in it. So the Garagistes, was originally a derogatory term. And lo and behold, over the last 10 or 20 years, people are paying attention. These small, artisanal wineries are making some pretty darn good stuff. And it might be worth visiting the small guys next time you go to Paso Robles and then then the giant places. And we’re one of those. So we’re proudly one of the Garagistes. We make wine in a car garage. Gosh, it was six bays or a couple of brothers and a big body shop in the back. And so they kept their high-end race cars, and they actually had a John Deere antique tractor collection as well in the garage where a winery is. So you’ll see it, a nondescript metal building with a red door for the tasting room. And eventually, we’re going to get our name on the building. But there’s a sign out front on the road. But that’s where we are for now. I mean, if we’re in a wildly successful days, we could move over to the farm next to the vineyard. And we’ve got some really cool space over there that would be great to expand into. But we just have to run the business conservatively and make it all work.

So when you started the winery, were you at all hesitant about whether it would work in your climates and your soil? They say if it grows peaches, it’ll grow grapes. And where our vineyard is part of a former six hundred acre ranch. Our consultant came out there that first day and we said, well, meet us in the peach farm.  And he said, oh, you won’t even need it to get soil samples. If you had peach trees here. You’re good to go. We took soil samples anyway, but you’ll see that like the Palisades in California, I think there are some vineyards in South Africa like that where you’ll see vineyards and peach orchards next to each other. So there’s something about that. I guess the conditions are comparable, were favorable for both. We have a great site for a vineyard and we grow about 30 percent of our production is hybrids.

It’s time, boys and girls for our listener voicemail. Hi, this is Judy from North Carolina. How do you choose the right wine glass? Me personally, I don’t even use a glass. I just drink straight from the bottle. But if you’re going to be sophisticated, you want a wide glass for reds, narrow for whites, tall, narrow flute style for sparkling. Thank you for your question, Judy. I’ll get your free T-shirt out to you as soon as possible. Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show, tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Pecan Creek Winery – Muskogee, OK Pt. 1

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. Our featured winery in this episode. We head to Oklahoma City, where the average commute time is 17 minutes. Not bad considering mine is an hour and a half. The average household size is two. Median family income forty-seven thousand. Yes. Carrie Underwood was born here talking about Muskogee, Oklahoma, also home to: I’m Bob Wickizer. I am the winemaker and co-owner of Pecan Creek Winery in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Glad to be here. How did you get to this point where you started Pecan Winery? Well, wasn’t that the Grateful Dead? Who’s saying about what a long, strange trip it’s been? My resumé and in brief ranges from being a physicist and medical imaging and starting and selling to companies, software companies, and Silicon Valley to firms. And that’s where I learned winemaking and wine appreciation wine pairing than that after a number of years and three years of commuting to Asia for a semiconductor project, I went to seminary in Cambridge, Mass. Became an ordained Episcopal priest, was up and down the East Coast in Washington, D.C., at the National Cathedral for a year. And then I got tired of that and wanted to be under the radar. So I’ve been in Muskogee, Oklahoma, for about 10 years. I would get frozen grapes and make wine as kind of a hobby. And a member of the community says, gosh, you got to do something with that. Well, we partnered up and he’s the farmer. I’m the winemaker with that background.

Bob, I imagine that you get pretty adventurous sometimes in winemaking.

I have made a little bit of wine from concentrates just to see what it’s like in general. We do not use concentrate except in two parts of the production process. And by the way, those are completely legal in France and California. One is chaptalization, when in fermentation and we may use the grape concentrate to boost our sugar level up one or two bricks just to get a desired final alcohol concentration. And we may also use grape concentrate in final sweetening back sweetening of the wine to produce a sweeter wine outside of that. No, there’s no concentrate in this process at all.

In the wine business, your job can be varied. Is there such a thing as a typical day for you?

I wouldn’t know. Typical if it hit me between the eyes. But a lot of times I’m still the rector of an Episcopal church. Now we have virtual services and all that stuff. Besides writing and producing services. Every week I have three or four other articles I write online. And we’re the only Episcopal Church in Muskogee. But I’m right church stuff for three or four hours, between four-thirty each, starting about four, 30 or five in the morning. And then myself, crew, I’ll get something to eat some coffee myself. Our crew gets in about 9:00 every Monday. They have one or two pages of a detailed list of what to do. And I go over every day for about 45 minutes or so just to clarify and answer questions and occasionally do calculations.

I get an aside, being a physicist, I’m astonished at the lack of math skills in the general population.

So I’m doing all the dosing calculations and transfer calculations and filtering determination’s stuff like that. So any problems need to get resolved. I may do them in the morning or I’ll go back to church or stay home, one of those three and then the winemaking duties.

Besides that, also amount to managing sales, managing finance, purchasing department. I think the other day I counted up 17 hats I wear.

So it’s a good thing, too, because I don’t have any hair all its time. Boys and Girls for our listener voicemail.

Hi, this is Alex from Muskogee, Oklahoma. I’m interested in knowing how different great and different grow based on different climates and different altitudes across the United States and how that affects the different quality of wine produced. Thank you.

As the saying goes, some wines have attitude. Some wines have altitude. But it’s a good question. The Napa Valley in California maxes out at about 3000 feet. You head over to Europe and you’ve got 4000 feet. And then Argentina checks in at the highest with almost 10. Thousand feet. You could make a case that the higher the altitude, the better the wine. However, you could also make a case that it doesn’t matter. You could say what really matters is the process. Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: AppleSpotifyGoogleDeezerStitcherTuneinBreakerCastbox.

 

 

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Prairie Berry Winery – Hill City, SD Pt. 3

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. We finished our last episode with Angela from Prairie Berry Winery talking about their wine club and it’s one of the biggest wine clubs in the United States. How big is it?

So we have one of the largest wine clubs in the country. We have about 5000 wine club members from across the United States. We ship our wines four times a year to our members and then they enjoy other benefits, such as events and discounts and shipping perks and our wine clubs called Gen five. So it’s a play on Generation five, which, as I mentioned before, is the fifth generation winemaker. I’ve never seen anything like it. When our guests come in this summer and they try our wines, most often they live outside of the region. They want to continue that relationship with us in the Black Hills. And then you go to the wine club information and you can enroll right online or you can call any of our wine club concierge and I can walk you through the enrollment process. But it’s pretty simple. You just tell us what kind of wine you want to get. We do a mix, so that would be dry and sweet wine. Or you can choose all sweet. And then we include a beautiful newsletter that includes recipes and information about wine and some fun stories and tidbits from the company.

I must say, I’m very impressed to looking at the statistics of visitorship to Mount Rushmore and the visitors that you get at Prairie Berry Winery. They’re very close. So pretty much everybody who goes to the park is also stopping by to see what you have to offer. Right. Yeah, You can’t have one without the other. Right. Marketing campaign for this summer is actually South Dakota, home of red ass rhubarb and Mount Rushmore, where you take the lead on our campaign this summer. So your winery is just not about Red Ass Rhubarb wine. It’s not just to fruit wines. You have a very large variety. Most people are eager and excited. They’ve seen our billboards. They’ve seen, you know, our social media. And so they have an idea of what to expect. But I think lots of people are pleasantly surprised when they try. You know, a wine, native rhubarb, or a wine native blackcurrants. We have a pumpkin wine. So I think the eye-opening experience for some who will maybe never experienced a fruit wine. We do also make great lines. You know, your traditional European style cabernet is in and things of that nature. So we have something for everybody. We are definitely proud of the fruit wines we make. And I like to surprise people who maybe have a preconceived notion of what a fruit, fruit wine is like. You know, based on either their family tradition or other wine experiences they might have had. Our Anna Pesa line is made kind of as a nod to that heritage from Eastern Europe. So those are going to be a more traditional style wines. You know, your drier reds and whites and some common grapes that you might recognize, such as Marleau, for example. But some other more Eastern European grapes that maybe people aren’t always quite familiar with, like blouse franc issues is a great dry red wine that we make for the and a line. It’s just a delight. Okay. As we conclude part three of our adventure to Prarie Berry Winery in Hill City, South Dakota. Let’s get all your contact info.

Our Web site is PrairieBerry.com. And our phone number is 605.574.3898. And you can find us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, if you follow Prairie Berry.

Will, somebody answer that phone? Its time, boys and girls for our listener voicemail. Hi this is Janet from New Mexico. I am not much of a wine drinker, but some of my friends are. So what would be a good way to start with?

Thank you for your question, Janet. Surely can’t be serious. I have no idea your taste preferences, but the experts suggest pinot grigio, Pinot Noir. Don’t be shy. Go ahead. Jump right in any way. And whatever your friends are drinking, they may not want to give up their glass. I want to make them again. But go ahead, pry it out of their hands, and sample what they have.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.  Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Prairie Berry Winery – Hill City, SD Pt. 2

https://thebestwinepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Prairie-Berry-Winery-Ep.-7-Pt.-2.mp3

         Prairie Berry Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is, we continue our conversation with Angela of Prairie Berry Winery in Hill City, South Dakota. So we’ve won over a thousand international awards for our wine. When I tell people that sometimes, you know, they look at our labels are very whimsical and attractive, people enjoy the artwork on our labels. Right. And so when I tell them about the awards that we won, for example, for our flagship wine Red Ass Rhubarb, they’ll say, oh, it’s the name, but wine competitions are blind. So the judges don’t know what they’re tasting, speaks for itself. Okay. I would be remiss if I don’t ask about your most awarded wine and how you came about the name.

Ralph, our winemaker’s dad was helping Sandy out of the winery one day with a wine back then that we called it, Razzy Rhubarb wine. So the story goes that his face turned red. He felt like an ass for messing up the wine. And so the wine became red as rhubarb and then we added a donkey to the label. And it’s our most famous line now, our most award winning wine. It’s a fine wine. It’s 90 percent rhubarb and 10 percent raspberry. It’s quite lovely. So Hill City, where the winery is located, I see where the population is just under a thousand people. So doesn’t necessarily reflect on how many visitors you get your winery per year.  Doesn’t know our hill city communities are great and they support us very much. But being in the Black Hills of South Dakota, not too far from Mount Rushmore, it’s a very popular tourist destination. So our door count, the number of people and guests we welcome into our winery each year is generally around one hundred and fifty thousand people that come and visit us. We’re happy to welcome them when they’re out visiting Mt. Rushmore, touring Deadwood and looking at the Web sites. Your complex just looks huge. So I imagine the two you’ve got guests when they come that they’re just not staying for wine tasting. They’re doing a multitude of things. We have not only very, very winery, but right next door. In 2013, we opened a miner brewing company. So a craft brewery, Sandy void, our winemakers, actually our brew master as well. She’s a woman of many talents. We also have an event center on site where we host parties and weddings, reunions, things of that nature. And then we have a concert on normal times. Every summer we’d be hosting outdoor concerts. We have a basketball court, long games. So we really encourage our guests to join us for more than a wine tasting and spend an afternoon having lunch with us or enjoying some life music, having a pint of beer so you can really make a day of it. And I love it to the tune. Kind of a holistic approach at the winery because it’s just not about wine. You’re also helping with the community, with the farmer’s market. We do. We hosted a farmer’s market every Tuesday morning. It is a community’s farmer’s market and we just welcome them to our station and help promote it. And so that’s great for the community. The locals, as well as the tourists, have fresh produce once a week and in our area. Yeah. Yeah. Local farmers. Local growers. Yeah. You can pick up fresh meat at a farmer’s market in South Dakota. Nothing wrong with a big scoop of Midwestern charm. You sound very proud to work at Prairie Brewery. Have you been there long? Yeah, it’s been really amazing to see. I started as a tasting room associate. Just doing wine tastings in the summer is kind of a part time job. And my husband and I first first landed in the Black Hills and have been able to grow with the company myself and watch the company grow. And we’re all very, like I said, humbled, but very proud of what we’re able to do and what we’re able to offer. In part three of our conversation with Angela Prairie Brewery Winery, we’ll find out just how big their wine club is. I’ll give you a hint. It’s one of the largest in the United States.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by ISYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

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