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Prairie Berry Winery – Hill City, SD Ep.7 Pt. 3

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. We finished our last episode with Angela from Prairie Berry Winery talking about their wine club and it’s one of the biggest wine clubs in the United States. How big is it?

So we have one of the largest wine clubs in the country. We have about 5000 wine club members from across the United States. We ship our wines four times a year to our members and then they enjoy other benefits, such as events and discounts and shipping perks and our wine clubs called Gen five. So it’s a play on Generation five, which, as I mentioned before, is the fifth generation winemaker. I’ve never seen anything like it. When our guests come in this summer and they try our wines, most often they live outside of the region. They want to continue that relationship with us in the Black Hills. And then you go to the wine club information and you can enroll right online or you can call any of our wine club concierge and I can walk you through the enrollment process. But it’s pretty simple. You just tell us what kind of wine you want to get. We do a mix, so that would be dry and sweet wine. Or you can choose all sweet. And then we include a beautiful newsletter that includes recipes and information about wine and some fun stories and tidbits from the company.

I must say, I’m very impressed to looking at the statistics of visitorship to Mount Rushmore and the visitors that you get at Prairie Berry Winery. They’re very close. So pretty much everybody who goes to the park is also stopping by to see what you have to offer. Right. Yeah, You can’t have one without the other. Right. Marketing campaign for this summer is actually South Dakota, home of red ass rhubarb and Mount Rushmore, where you take the lead on our campaign this summer. So your winery is just not about Red Ass Rhubarb wine. It’s not just to fruit wines. You have a very large variety. Most people are eager and excited. They’ve seen our billboards. They’ve seen, you know, our social media. And so they have an idea of what to expect. But I think lots of people are pleasantly surprised when they try. You know, a wine, native rhubarb, or a wine native blackcurrants. We have a pumpkin wine. So I think the eye-opening experience for some who will maybe never experienced a fruit wine. We do also make great lines. You know, your traditional European style cabernet is in and things of that nature. So we have something for everybody. We are definitely proud of the fruit wines we make. And I like to surprise people who maybe have a preconceived notion of what a fruit, fruit wine is like. You know, based on either their family tradition or other wine experiences they might have had. Our Anna Pesa line is made kind of as a nod to that heritage from Eastern Europe. So those are going to be a more traditional style wines. You know, your drier reds and whites and some common grapes that you might recognize, such as Marleau, for example. But some other more Eastern European grapes that maybe people aren’t always quite familiar with, like blouse franc issues is a great dry red wine that we make for the and a line. It’s just a delight. Okay. As we conclude part three of our adventure to Prarie Berry Winery in Hill City, South Dakota. Let’s get all your contact info.

Our Web site is PrairieBerry.com. And our phone number is 605.574.3898. And you can find us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, if you follow Prairie Berry.

Will, somebody answer that phone? Its time, boys and girls for our listener voicemail. Hi this is Janet from New Mexico. I am not much of a wine drinker, but some of my friends are. So what would be a good way to start with?

Thank you for your question, Janet. Surely can’t be serious. I have no idea your taste preferences, but the experts suggest pinot grigio, Pinot Noir. Don’t be shy. Go ahead. Jump right in any way. And whatever your friends are drinking, they may not want to give up their glass. I want to make them again. But go ahead, pry it out of their hands, and sample what they have.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.  Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Prairie Berry Winery – Hill City, SD Ep. 7 Pt. 2

         Prairie Berry Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is, we continue our conversation with Angela of Prairie Berry Winery in Hill City, South Dakota. So we’ve won over a thousand international awards for our wine. When I tell people that sometimes, you know, they look at our labels are very whimsical and attractive, people enjoy the artwork on our labels. Right. And so when I tell them about the awards that we won, for example, for our flagship wine Red Ass Rhubarb, they’ll say, oh, it’s the name, but wine competitions are blind. So the judges don’t know what they’re tasting, speaks for itself. Okay. I would be remiss if I don’t ask about your most awarded wine and how you came about the name.

Ralph, our winemaker’s dad was helping Sandy out of the winery one day with a wine back then that we called it, Razzy Rhubarb wine. So the story goes that his face turned red. He felt like an ass for messing up the wine. And so the wine became red as rhubarb and then we added a donkey to the label. And it’s our most famous line now, our most award winning wine. It’s a fine wine. It’s 90 percent rhubarb and 10 percent raspberry. It’s quite lovely. So Hill City, where the winery is located, I see where the population is just under a thousand people. So doesn’t necessarily reflect on how many visitors you get your winery per year.  Doesn’t know our hill city communities are great and they support us very much. But being in the Black Hills of South Dakota, not too far from Mount Rushmore, it’s a very popular tourist destination. So our door count, the number of people and guests we welcome into our winery each year is generally around one hundred and fifty thousand people that come and visit us. We’re happy to welcome them when they’re out visiting Mt. Rushmore, touring Deadwood and looking at the Web sites. Your complex just looks huge. So I imagine the two you’ve got guests when they come that they’re just not staying for wine tasting. They’re doing a multitude of things. We have not only very, very winery, but right next door. In 2013, we opened a miner brewing company. So a craft brewery, Sandy void, our winemakers, actually our brew master as well. She’s a woman of many talents. We also have an event center on site where we host parties and weddings, reunions, things of that nature. And then we have a concert on normal times. Every summer we’d be hosting outdoor concerts. We have a basketball court, long games. So we really encourage our guests to join us for more than a wine tasting and spend an afternoon having lunch with us or enjoying some life music, having a pint of beer so you can really make a day of it. And I love it to the tune. Kind of a holistic approach at the winery because it’s just not about wine. You’re also helping with the community, with the farmer’s market. We do. We hosted a farmer’s market every Tuesday morning. It is a community’s farmer’s market and we just welcome them to our station and help promote it. And so that’s great for the community. The locals, as well as the tourists, have fresh produce once a week and in our area. Yeah. Yeah. Local farmers. Local growers. Yeah. You can pick up fresh meat at a farmer’s market in South Dakota. Nothing wrong with a big scoop of Midwestern charm. You sound very proud to work at Prairie Brewery. Have you been there long? Yeah, it’s been really amazing to see. I started as a tasting room associate. Just doing wine tastings in the summer is kind of a part time job. And my husband and I first first landed in the Black Hills and have been able to grow with the company myself and watch the company grow. And we’re all very, like I said, humbled, but very proud of what we’re able to do and what we’re able to offer. In part three of our conversation with Angela Prairie Brewery Winery, we’ll find out just how big their wine club is. I’ll give you a hint. It’s one of the largest in the United States.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by ISYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Prairie Berry Winery – Hill City, SD Ep.7 Pt. 1

 

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is: We venture to Hill City, South Dakota. The oldest existing city in Pennington County. A 15-minute mule ride from Mount Rushmore. And about 70 miles from Belle Fourche, South Dakota, which is the geographic center of the United States. Hi, this is Angela from Prairie Berry Winery. I am the director of sales and marketing. Hello, Angela. I’ve heard of a Rocky Mountain oyster, but what is a prairie berry? It came from our winemaker, Sandy Vojta as a family heritage, actually in the late eighteen hundreds, her family, who came making wine in Europe, emigrated to the plains of South Dakota when they got here. There wasn’t much to make wine from. Obviously no grapes, things of that nature. So her great great grandmother. Her name was Anna Pesä. She started picking berries and chokecherries and buffalo berries, anything that she could find on the prairie of South Dakota. And she would refer to them as prairie berries. That story has been passed down for five generations and the winemaking tradition. And so when Sandy and her father and husband decided to start this business, it was easy to decide on the name. Prairie Berry Winery. And Anna Pesä comes here from Europe. What time frame in American history are we talking about? 1876. That was about the time in South Dakota with Deadwood was coming up in Wild Bill and Calamity Jane. And they happened to immigrate to the northern north-central plains of South Dakota, near Mobridge. Today’s what some Mobridge, South Dakota, not far from there. So 1876, Was she doing this for commercial reasons or just doing it because of what they did in her heritage to do it for themselves? Certainly, it was the tradition the women in the family would make the wine, course in the cold plains of South Dakota. That’s probably something they wanted to do to continue. Her husband would go down to the banks of the Missouri River and cut down oak trees, actually, and make her wine barrels so that she could continue producing wine just for the family. So your winemakers Sandy is a fifth-generation winemaker and she picked it up from her father, Ralph. Tell me about that. So he was making wine in his basement in Mobridge, South Dakota, long before the winery started. And she was a young girl learning, learning the ways. And it just became a passion for her and her and her husband, Matt, and Ralph. Her dad decided in the late 1990s it was time to make it real and start an wine actual business with it. We just celebrated our 20th anniversary as a winery. Last year, 1999 was our first vintage and so to speak, of wine. Now, 20 years later, we are one of the most award-winning wineries in the region. So we’ve won over a thousand international awards for our wine. That concludes part one of our interview with Angela from Prairie Brewery Winery. In our next episode, we’ll learn about how a mistake can accidentally turn into an award-winning product. Will, somebody answer that phone? Well, it’s time Boys and Girls for our listener voicemail. Hi, my name is Sarah and I’m calling from Coon Rapids, Minnesota. I am interested in wineries in the United States. And I am curious how many female-owned wineries are there? There’s a lot of different variables that go into that question. What is ownership, 51 percent or 50 percent? Is it all based on monetary reasons or knowledge? I reached out to Amy Bess Cook of wowsonoma.com, an organization that focuses on women-owned wineries. And she told me that nearly 600 out of the 10000 wineries here in the United States are female-led. Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: AppleSpotifyGoogleDeezerStitcherTuneinBreakerCastbox.

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Dry Farm Wines Ep. 6 Pt. 3

Dry Farm Wines

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

We are speaking with Todd White, founder, and CEO of Dry Farm Wines. So having strict guidelines for your wine, how did you come up with the wineries? How did you select them? Because you just can’t go to Google and find these wineries and in the natural wine business. There are very specific subsections of the wine industry. It’s tiny, very, very small. And so everybody basically knows everyone else. There are natural wine fairs, about 50 of them. There are three in the United States, but there is about 50 across Europe. And so we attend all of these natural wine fairs. We’re not right now, but historically we have. Now, today, we’re the largest buyer and seller of natural wines in the world by multiple of probably 25 X, maybe more than that. So we’re internationally known, you know, as a buyer. Now, in the beginning, when I started the company, there were probably about 40 natural wine importers in the United States, meaning that all they sell are natural wine. Like in San Francisco. There are two natural wine bars I’m sorry, three now. They’re just activists. Right. Like, you just wouldn’t have a non-natural wine in there. It’s just not it’s a it’s a revolution. There are three, arguably only three natural wine retailers in San Francisco. Right. And they’re very small stores. So in the beginning, you know, I started reaching out to natural wine importers. I discovered this importer in Paris and American his name’s Josh Adler, who used to live in San Francisco and he moved to Paris and he started a national wine importing company into the United States. And he was the first one that discovered he owns a company called Paris Wine Company. We’re probably his largest customer today, I would imagine. But we do a lot of business with them. But in the beginning, I contacted him to learn about sort of the natural wine world. I began to uncover and discover people and get referred to other importers who specialize in natural wines. Now, today, we’re the largest importer of natural wines in the world. So we still work with about 80 importers today. But we also import directly our own wines. And we do that. We have normally this time of year, we would have four to six people on the ground spread across Europe right now, buying wines that normally we would spend the first six months of the year in Europe buying wines.

So you’ve got the sourcing figured out. So now comes the part on what to present to the customer, right? Well, we don’t sell wine by the bottle. We do custom curation for people. So. So every single box that our member gets is different and has different wines. And oh, no, we have wines that are requested. We also do customer fulfillment and specialize in fulfillment. And if somebody loves the bottle, they’ll, you know, write to us and want to potentially buy more or something similar to it. You know, Pinot Noir is probably our number one requested grape. But the interesting thing about us is because we deal with these small family farms and ancestral grape varietals around the world. Americans generally know the top eight with Chardonnay, Sauvignon blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot blanc, Pinot noir. But we sell hundreds of varietals that people have never heard of Schiava from Italy or, you know, Pino Dune from Loire Valley or, you know, many of these obscure ancestral grapes that people never heard of. So they wouldn’t know what to order. And then when we curate their box and they get this custom curated box, they order red white rosé sparkling and then we choose what goes in the box for them. So they’re getting this global, all these great varieties these are never heard of and they love and they get to experience, sort of like traveling around the wine countries of Europe. Right. And so if they were just going to order wine and order, you know, if they live in California, they want red wine, they’d probably water mellow cabernet sauvignon or Pinot Noir because that’s all the red wines they know. Right. They would know to order Schiava from Italy, which is lighter and fresher than a Pinot Noir, you know, or Pinot Dune, which is also like a very, very light and fresh version of Pinot that they just wouldn’t know. They get a lot of education just by allowing us to curate for them.

I see on the website there’s a 100 percent happiness guarantee. Tell me about that. Yeah, we also have a 100 percent happiness guarantee. Any bottle. You don’t love will replace it. No questions asked. You don’t have to send it back. You can drink it. I don’t care what you do. Would you tell us you didn’t like it? We’ll send you. We’ll give you a refund or send you another bottle. That is a 100 percent happiness guarantee. That concludes our. Interview with Todd White, founder of Dryfarmwines.com

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

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Dry Farm Wines Ep. 6 Pt. 2

Dry Farm Wines

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. We go on a different journey. We don’t drop into a specific winery.

We are speaking with Todd White, founder, and CEO of Dry Farm Wines.

There are 76 additives approved by the FDA for use in winemaking. Four of them are quite toxic. The most toxic is Dimethyl dicarbonate marketed under the brand name Velcorin. And it’s used to treat Brettanomyces, which is the most common bacterial fault and why it’s highly toxic. If you go to Dimethyl dicarbonate on Wikipedia, you’ll see how toxic it is.  Okay, I did look it up on Wikipedia Dimethyl dicarbonate. It is classified as toxic. The first warning is harmful if swallowed. It’s also toxic by inhalation. It causes burns. Well, that’s not really something that you want to be ingesting, especially if you’re going to be drinking it over a lifetime. Now, the public doesn’t know about these additives some and in fairness some are natural. Many are not. The wine industry spends millions of dollars a year and lobby money to keep content labeling and nutritional information off of wine labels. So you don’t have any idea how much sugar is in the wine you’re drinking. To people who care about their health sugar is a very important thing they want to know about. So our job is education. The wine sells itself. Now, that brings up the question. Dryfarmwines.com because of these strict guidelines. Why don’t you carry any domestic wines?  The reason being is that there are not really any U.S. wines that meet our criteria. And so you talk about U.S. wines. There are a number of difficult criteria for them to meet. And they’re in the order of dry farming. So almost all domestic vineyards are irrigated. Number two, alcohol. We don’t accept any alcohol over twelve and a half percent. And that’s lab tested by us. Alcohol stated on a wine bottle is not required by law to be accurate. So we did lab testing for alcohol. So there are virtually no U.S. wines made that are twelve and a half percent or lower in alcohol. Virtually none. And then the third most prevalent reason that a U.S. wine wouldn’t qualify for our program is cost. So all of our wines sell for exactly the same amount. They’re $22.00 a bottle.  There are no U.S. wines that meet our criteria of organic or biodynamic dry farming and alcohol that cost anywhere close to $22.00. The primary driver on a domestic wine price is going to be the cost of the land. All of U. S. vineyard costs are just so much higher than the capital cost of land in Europe and places like Beaujolais, where anywhere across Europe where most of these small family farms that produce natural wines that we buy wine from, most of them are multigenerational landowners, that they don’t have any capital costs.

We’re constantly being told to hydrate, drink more water. That philosophy does not transfer to grapevines. There are a lot of reasons not to irrigate a grapevine. And in most of Europe, it’s against the law to irrigate grapevines. Europeans have been making wine for over 3000 years. Now what we know, the moment you irrigate a great vine, you fundamentally change the physiology of how the fruit ripens. It also makes for a lazy vine and the fruit is actually less healthy. So the polyphenols, flavonoids, native flavonoids, and other healthy compounds that are found primarily in red wines are actually reduced with irrigation. They’re also reduced with non-organic farming. But the real issue on irrigation is that, yes, stress does create a higher quality fruit. Even people who irrigate know that because that’s the reason that you space vines close together is also the reason that you see wine companies, even the ones that are irrigated, will tout hillside true hillside selection as superior because any fruit that grows on a hillside is under greater stress than that fruit that grows on flat ground. Whether irrigated or not. So, yes, I think everybody universally agrees that stress is helpful in creating a higher quality and character of the fruit. Here’s the thing with irrigation. You see, it’s cheaper and easier to farm using irrigation. It also creates a higher yield and fruit that weighs more. It might not surprise you when you fill a great area with water. It weighs more. Fruit is sold by the ton. So irrigation is about money. Irrigation didn’t come to California for wine farming until the early 1970s. So prior to that, everything California was also transformed for dry farming. Now, less than one percent of California vineyards are dry-farmed because dry farming is more difficult, it requires more work and it’s more expensive. In our next episode, we’ll find out what happens when you drink a wine. With Low alcohol, sugar-free, toxic, free.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

 

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Dry Farm Wines Ep. 6 Pt. 1

 

Dry Farm Wines

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. We go on a different journey. We don’t drop into a specific winery.

We are speaking with Todd White, founder, and CEO of Dry Farm Wines.

Yes. Dryfarmwines.com. The only health-focused natural wine club in the world. We’ll get into the intricacies a little bit later. But first, let’s get where the inspiration came from.

Well, Dry Farm Wines was not intended to be a business in the beginning. So I do remember a specific inspiration that was a specific wine like a Pinot Noir from Mosel, Germany, that I was drinking at Zuni Cafe in San Francisco. That led me to the exceptionally inspired by natural wines. So I wasn’t thinking of Dry Farm Wines as a business at that time. I was just had discovered quite by accident the remarkable taste and texture of natural wines. And as a result, that kind of started me down the path of investigating natural wines and at a deeper level, which eventually led to the business.

Okay. Before your mind gets too far down the road of traditional wine thinking.

The first thought from Scott is we think of ourselves as a health food company, not as a wine club. This is a health food company first. So the second point is less than one-tenth of one percent of wines in the world are naturally grown and produced.

Why do you let your mind marinate around those two thoughts? Todd continues to educate us on the philosophy of the company.

Well, I mean, nobody. We created the category of healthy wines and sort of branded, as we think of ourselves as a health food company, not as a wine club. So we just happened to sell wine, have healthy food. So no one had really captured lab testing and quantifying wine around health quantifications. So we were the first to do it. Really were the only one to do it even today. As a result, when we started educating people on what’s really in commercial wines, not just organic wines. So organic is a farming method. You can have organic wines, but they’re not natural. Natural wine is a very specific protocol and category. And it’s very rare. Less than one-tenth of one percent of wines in the world are naturally grown and produced. So natural wine is a very specific category that has a very clear and specific understanding around the world for people who are in the natural wine business. We just happen to be in the right place at the right time in trying to solve a problem from ourselves. I wanted to drink healthier, lower alcohol wines that were sugar-free and met other criteria that were of interest to me. It turns out that the same concept was of interest to a lot of other wine drinkers. And so it’s always been my feeling that regular wine drinkers, meaning that people who drink daily as I do, people who drink wine every evening, most of them think they probably drink too much. Right. And so offering them a lower alcohol alternative that’s also natural and sugar-free, which is of interest to our customers. There just wasn’t any offer out there in the marketplace that did so, combining that with a long public speaking television appearances. You know, Podcasts that have aired to millions of people and our business just grew very rapidly. And also, as people tasted the wines, you know, they taste better. And so that’s sort of what led to us becoming one of the fastest-growing private companies in the United States. That concludes Episode 1 of our conversation with CEO and founder Todd White of Dry Farm Wines in our next episode.

There are 76 additives approved by the FDA for the use and winemaking, and not all of them are good for you. We’ll get into that next time. But first, it’s time. Boys and girls for our listener voicemail. Hi, this is Amber from Chicago. My question is, what’s the difference between organic wine and regular wine? I’m curious to know if it’s chemicals and is there any kind of regulation around it? What do I need to know? Looking forward to hearing your answer. Well, Amber, it’s a very complex question. Organic wine is made from grapes that have been grown without the use of artificial or synthetic chemicals such as herbicides and pesticides. But by saying it’s organic doesn’t necessarily mean that it doesn’t have additives. And as we learned earlier from Todd, just because it says organic doesn’t make it the best wine.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Post Winery – Altus, AR Ep. 5 Pt. 3

Post Winery – Altus, Arkansas

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

We continue our conversation with Tina Post of Post Winery and Altus, Arkansas, as she explains the depths they go to ensure quality control.

We take care of our vineyards and we harvest. We haul that. We bring it to the winery, which it’s just six miles away, which is really nice for the assurance of fruit quality. And then we process it. We package it. We develop the package. And we distribute to at four different levels. We know we work with brokers. We work in different states. We what we are our distributor. We also do retail. So we’re a business. And I think this is just wonderful. It makes it really interesting always to that take something from the ground to the table. And usually, that’s not the case. You’re one part of that, you know, in the process. But we literally do it from the ground to the table. You know, we built a distribution center that’s temperature controlled. We use the same refrigeration that we use for our cold fermentation tanks and our distribution centers. So everything is controlled. And, you know, with wine, that’s a big thing. You need sterile filtering. You need you know, we do liquid nitrogen drip on the line to everything to try and ensure the quality and the end being shelf-stable. You know, back in the 60s, it was very different. We had a bunch of wooden tanks and I hope over the years now we use wooden stays or wood chips for some of the things that, you know, everything’s stainless steel cold fermentation. Do you either evolve or you won’t get shelf space anymore? There’s too much competition to not make a good shelf, stable wine.

I can’t imagine that it’s an easy task. Running a winery, the size of yours, and the diversity that you have. So as a business, I’m sure you’re always looking to pivot to something new or changing, I think is the business.

Any business you always have to be reinventing yourself because the markets changed. You know, a couple of years ago for us in Arkansas, we had small farm winery laws and now we it’s opened up to national brands. That competition got fierce. It’s you know before it was a little easier because only small farm wineries could sell in your convenience stores chain accounts. And now it’s opened that. And so the competition is really fierce.

We’ll take a short break. And when we come back, Tina will tell us what Post Winery is working on for the future need to satisfy a hungry mind.

Every week,  Your Brain on Facts brings you science. Why does Mint feel cold? History. King Charles. The 2nd of Spain was so inbred his family didn’t bother educating him music. Many hit songs and even entire albums were written for revenge technology. The first videogame was made on an oscilloscope in 1958 and every other topic under the sun. Look for your brain on facts, on your favorite podcast app or at Yourbrainonfacts.com

What have you got planned for the future?  One of the things we’re doing is coming out with a line. It’s kind of a new series we’re putting together and we’re going to be doing. It’s going to be unique to us. Wines with a  little higher price. We’re going to have smaller batches. It might be regional flavor, but it might be fruit from other areas. Like this year. We brought in fresh cabernet fruit from the Yakima Valley in Washington State.

It’s going to be one in the series, but it’ll you know, we won’t do thousands of cases. It’ll be a smaller lot. Well, it’s kind of fun if you’re the winemakers to get to do that.

And when you’re working the tasting bar to say what the latest is in our winemaker’s series or whatever, we’re going to name it, which is we’re working on that as we speak.

Will, somebody answer that phone? Well, boys and girls its time for our listener voicemail. This is Joseph Johnson from Texas. I’m, of course, and to you is why do people slurp wine when they drink? You begin first with the power to activate the wine. People are stupid, and it could be really annoying. Well, Joseph, maybe you should try it. Maybe it will release some magic powers. I know your mother probably told you not to slurp when you were drinking from a straw. Don’t slurp. Don’t slurp when you’re eating your Fruit Loops. But the slurping elevates the wine in your mouth and helps intensify the flavors and aromas.

Thank you, Joseph, for your entertaining question. Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of The Best 5 Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show. Please tell your friends and pets and subscribe until next time, pour the wine, and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Post Winery – Altus, AR Ep. 5 Pt. 2

Post Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is as continue our conversation with Tina Post of Post Winery and Altus, Arkansas. So since you are one of the biggest wineries in the United States, just a rough estimate, how many people have you got coming through your establishment?

Oh, gosh. We have about oh, I would say fifty thousand a year in retail maybe. But we are also the largest producer in Arkansas. We are as far as size, you know, where you could put all the other wineries here together and that be about not even half of what we produce. So as far as just getting an idea, I guess size, but yeah, it’s impressive.

So to paint a picture when you come into the parking lot. What do we see?

We have a retail outlet where you can take tours, do tastings, eat and the Trellis room. And just, you know, we have a gift shop in there and around the retail we have a picnic area. And then around it, it’s kind of worked into our beds around the winery, which we have. We grow everything from cucumbers and tomatoes to all our herbs we use in the kitchen. There’s places to run the dogs and stretch your legs. We also in our south part of the parking lot we have Harvest’s House members that come in they can stay overnight.

Staying overnight is obviously an added bonus, if you fully engulf yourself in your experience of going through everything that you’ve got at the time that we’re recording this. We’re in the middle of the Covid -19 pandemic. And I I’m just guessing that to your winery is closed as well.

Yes, we have. In fact, I’m we’re just literally trying to figure out what the new normal is going to be. And then when you ask the question, what do you see? And, you know, I was. Well, that’s what you’re going to see as far as what we’re going to be able to do. That’s really up in the air, like taking a tour through the facility. Do we have everybody in a mask which our tours are really fun because they’re a basic winemaking tour and you get to see if we’re crashing that day. You get to watch a crash. If we’re bottling, you get to watch that. It’s so it’s really an interesting tour. It’s like winemaking one to one. And a lot of people really appreciate getting to see the distribution center and see how that works. Education is a potent part of what we do, whether it’s about wines behind the tasting bar or just about the whole process and how nature works. You know, the different seasons. That’s one thing people do like. They’ll say, you know where the grapes. But sometimes they say that in the middle of the winter, which is kind of interesting.

So to get people, you know, this is how it works. This is how the process works and, you know, getting people back connected to the dirt, to the land, because at the end of the day, we’re farmers first to winemakers and we’re actually a winery who that actually produces are even we make cuttings. We we make cuttings. And so we plant the grapes. We make cuttings from the vines, because to propagate grapes you have you don’t do it from a seed. You don’t know what you get. So you do it from the wood of the vine that you want to propagate. So we make cuttings and it’s just pieces of that by. We cut and we propagate from that. And we also sell those vines and we sell the new cuttings. They’re called the new plants a year to three years old. We also sell those to other vineyards. And just people who want to cuttings and put them in gallon pots and sell them to people who want to have something in their backyard.

I mean; you have to get some of those cuttings. So I’ll go to the web site, post winery. com postwinery.com p o s t winery dot com. If you’d like to get one for yourself.

Will somebody answer that phone? Okay, it is time for our listener voicemail. Hi, Neal. From Ohio. My question is what are legs?

All right, Neil from Ohio. Here is your answer. Well, people tend to make a big deal about what they call legs, or as some people call them, tears of wine. But really, all they indicate is alcohol percentage. So you take the wine glass and swirl it around, and that’s when the legs appear. If the legs are thin and they move very quickly, that means low alcohol content in the wine and then obviously thicker and slower a higher percentage of alcohol. Thanks for your question, Neal. Really appreciate it.

I’m not giving you a sponge bath.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best Five Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time, pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

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Post Winery – Altus, AR Ep. 5 Pt. 1

Post Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. Our featured winery in this episode is Post Winery.

We head to the state that ranks number one in rice and poultry production. My wife’s favorite author, John Grisham is from the state. The state’s musical instrument is the fiddle.

You’ve got to have a fiddle in the band. What was that? You’ve got to have a fiddle in the band. Thank you, Alabama. No, we’re not talking about Alabama.

We’re talking about the only state that produces diamonds.

Arkansas is home to Post Winery, it is the largest winery in this region. It is in the top 60 as far as size goes in the United States. We produce about 268,000 gallons of wine and juice every year. My name is Tina Post and I’m one of the fifth-generation family members working here at Post. We wear several hats. Mine is managing the retail and gift shop. The Trellis Room which is our farm to table food program. I do H.R. and things like cultivating our garden for our restaurant. We’re located in northwest Arkansas really at the base of the Boston mountains Altus.

Arkansas is the site and because of where it’s located it offers some unique growing capabilities.

We actually have a recognized as a viticulture area. It’s called Altus the outer sort of cultural area and we grow 5 different species of grapes which is very unique and I think America to grow those commercially. We’re kind of where the North meets the South and the East meets the West potentially. We have the beta Spanish fruit. Like your Chardonnay and Zinfandel. Labrusca like the Niagara Delaware Concord of course falls into that category. French hybrids like save all the doll and yellow beta festivals which is the Cynthia and the great. It’s also known as Norton if you go into Missouri and they’ll call it Norton and beat us pretend to follow which are the mascot eyes. This is as far north as it grows commercially Altus, Arkansas.

So out of those 5 varieties that you mentioned do you have a favorite?

Yes. The muscadine line it’s a flagship great for us. It’s a thick-skinned grape that hangs in clusters as opposed to bunches and it is indigenous to North America. And it only grows below the Mason-Dixon line. It’s a grape that was written about oh it goes back into the 1580s when it was written about by the early colonists talking about the wonderful aroma, the Mother Vine is in North Carolina. And it is called. It’s a Scuppernong, which is a wide variety of the muscadine a lot of times people use governance synonymously with muscadine because it’s the most popular or well-known variety. It is a variety and there are white and red varieties of the mascot on and the red varieties they range in color from fuchsia to black and the white or light from chartreuse to deep bronze very nostalgic in the south and people remember picking it when they were young behind their grandparent’s horns and they literally make jams and jelly and still a lot of homemade wine.

What else does the Post Winery offer? We will touch on that in episode 2 as now it is time for our listener voicemail.

Question Hi, this is Christina from Hemet, California. I was wondering about a wine that I had at a restaurant. How do I get it? That sounds like a simple question but don’t be shy. Go ahead and ask the restaurant. They will not get offended if you ask them where they get the wine. They won’t add an extra charge on your bill and you can also check out of the App Store for the app. The ViVino App is a good one.

Love your show and I like your style. Thank you for your question, Christina. We’d like to submit a question we’d love to hear from you. Go to thebestwinepodcast.com

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast was produced by IHYSM. If you like the show, tell your friends and pets and subscribe. Until next time pour the wine and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

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Ports of New York Winery – Ithaca, NY Ep. 4 Pt. 3

Ports of New York Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. I’m the owner Frédéric Bouché and the winemaker of Ports of New York Winery. Welcome to Part 3 of our conversation with Frédéric Bouché. Can’t wait to get into it. So many fascinating stories with Mr. Bouche. Imagined having a winery with your style and the way that you’re so personable that you hear some interesting stories from your patrons had something to do.

I mean, the winery there is because we make fortified wines and expands. Not that long ago, that was beautiful fast. I had a group of Indians from India and they were all scoters. Only one of them did not speak English at all. And as we were talking about various types of fortified wines, I was using the term Madeira, which is also Portuguese. That person wouldn’t even speak English. I actually picked up on that word and get some saying it over and over again. So I asked the other guests. How come that person doesn’t speak English? Clearly knows that word. Well, this was because Madeira is the word in overdo. That means alcohol.

And that opens a completely incredible page of each story. In fact, the Portuguese have been bringing Madeira to exchange for spices.

And so it ended up being that they adopted that word Madeira to mean alcohol because, again, it’s not for this alcohol. So I understand that you do not have a vineyard on sites. You do not grow your own grapes. But this isn’t something that is new to you. This goes back a long way. The winery I grew up in, our vineyards were not on site. They were in the fall of the region, which we get them until the late 70s, early in the family. But the winery was the main building where I grew up was no more. So I don’t want to deal with going great. It’s a whole other job. So we are in the middle of it. They got along the water and it’s an open winery, one of the very first one in New York. So it was very challenging as far as laws and everything to make that happen. Well, I should mention something else, actually. We pre-buy our grapes by the ton without knowing what the harvest is, somebody quality. So in a sense, it’s as if we were growing old grape. But the final product is whatever nature is going to bring us. We’re going to deal with it. And it is truly a very different thing to own, to make the wine. Then two on top of it has to deal with a farm.

Let me see if I can get the timeline correct, you arrived in Ithaca, New York in about 1994. The thought of the winery, things started marinating, and then in 2003, there were some new laws are going to be put into effect that would affect your plans built on the land. You put the buildings up, the lights on, and you got to the equipment and everything was finished in 2006. And then four years later, you opened in 2010 and you started making the ports because that takes what you were telling me, a four-year minimum. So from 1990 forward to 2010, almost 16 years, you poured your money into this, so. Yeah. You’ve got to have some money if you want to start a wine business.

I always say to everybody, I go, you have a lot of money. Keep your job. And that’s exactly what we did. We stayed really tight to focus and invested in the know at all in this whole thing and very carefully.

I mentioned this before, but it still amazes me because I just love people that are so well-rounded and accomplished. But if you go to the Web site, it’s ports of New York dot com and you’ll see that the buildings there are Bouché has built are very authentic. And you couldn’t tell that it was freshly built.

Yes. Yeah, absolutely. I love building things the way we like to have them. No, we are not afraid to do it and take it down and redo it if it needed before you like it better another way.

So we take our time and do it in a way because of the types of customers. I mean, you have I mean, there are several, but they are the basic line out there one to one problem, just what they think and the one who wants to have the floor expand. And it’s very hard to accommodate both at the same time for most of the time, people who come just for pacing and are benefiting from the full extent.

Yes. Benefiting from the whole experience is the goal. Do you have a favorite scene since you’re running everything from greeting the customer at the front door to taking the grapes and doing the paperwork work in just a building, the building? Do you have a favorite to project that you like?

Well, I think I tried to. I mean, again, my wife and I tried to enjoy every step as much as possible because sometimes it’s actual work beyond what I would like to handle.

But just like anything we do, I like to handle the cast. I like to handle the grapes themselves. Like to work on the label, you know, line up everything. And, you know, after so many years, I mean, even now white, which is your age, is to take a minimum of one-year neutral guest. It’s wonderful to put it on the shelf next to you.

Are you deciding to label it? Yeah. Yeah, I’ll take that on their label.

Yeah. So you’ve you know, obviously you’ve got your art background, but, you know, that’s difficult sometimes when you try to mix that with computers.

So we are. Yeah, I’m looking at the shelf right now, actually. I should tell you, we are. We just bottle the champagne of the sparkling wine, which is going to be the new product that we will release it hopefully sometime this summer will make all the wine. And these other wines, our full private customers, we do very few of them are here every year and people we like to interact with.

So it’s not you know, we don’t say yes to anyone because it’s a long process. You know, you’re going to have to hang out with these people quite a bit. You want to make sure you’re on the same wavelength.

Ok. As we close out our conversation, I’m going to throw you a curveball. Do you have a wine picked out for your daughter’s wedding?

Oh, my, my, my, my. A good question. We have a long way to go, and I will have no problem doing that. That’s a really good question. Ok, let’s get your contact info out there. PortsofNew York.com and the phone number is 607-220-6317

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best Five Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe until next time, pour the wine, and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

 

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Ports of New York Winery – Ithaca, NY Ep. 4 Pt. 2

Ports of New York Winery – Ithaca, NY

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is Ports of New York as we continue our conversation with Frédéric Bouché Ports of New York, owner-operator.

And then what happened is that my wife and I moved to the Finger Lakes region in 94 because she got a position at Cornell University and was to join the region. So it was kind of ironic after all the years that I was away from it, I fell back into it. And so I built a lot of issues and a lot of antiques and stuff from science here. And that’s one thing that we all for this completely unusual is that I was facing some kind of a little museum of French wine equipment.

So in between, that’s a time you obviously knew your family’s history and the leanings and the influence that they had had had. You had kind of a secret interest in dipping back into that or when you went to school in high studies?

I didn’t I you know, it was a very patriarchal world, not a pleasant place to hang out. So it wasn’t much more about the work.

And so I grew up in that and I just wanted to getaway. And when I went to study in Paris, I was super happy to not be thought of that. Although as we were traveling, my wife and I had a falling fifteen years. So we kept on making our old wine. Where I go or various grapes or you go under your truth. And so I never really left that. And coming in the Finger Lakes, I got in touch with other wine real owners then. And clearly Vienna was interested to get back into it. I understood the value of it, which I had not understood when I was much younger.

You’re having your background and things. Did you bring something a little different to winemaking? Table?

Yes. Here we decided. My wife and I decided to make wines that were different from what is made in the region because there are a lot of other wineries that make all the classic reasoning for that. So we make only French by wine, which means that blended. And we make a lot of that, a wholesale style which is so renewable. We make a bottle final, which is classic. We are talking about different origins, slightly different than the North American notion of a table wine.

In France, a table wine is not necessarily a cheap wine.

Supplying that you can rely on every day and one day is generally very versatile compared to the number of food. I’ll drink it by itself. I don’t fall very high in alcohol, only 12% some currently. We would go higher than that. And when I grow up, I’ll table wines were between nine and eleven for some alcohol. So that’s what we decided to focus on, but also fill these out for our base wines. But also we make too high on the wine, which are fortified wines, all that method wines. And these are a lot truculently. The oldest one is then that is 14 years old and the youngest blend is four years old.

So I don’t know. I’m from you go with a full airline system, but it’s a blend from the intake shooting days.

That concludes part two of our interview with Frédéric Bouché of Ports of New York.

In our final episode, we’ll find out what he likes most about the winemaking industry.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best Five Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe until next time, pour the wine, and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

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Ports of New York Winery – Ithaca, NY Ep. 4 Pt. 1



  In this episode, we talk with Frederic Bouche of Ports of New York Winery. We discuss his history of winemaking and French background.

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure.

Our featured winery is, we travel to Ithaca, New York, home to Cornell University, and also has the highest percentage of workers who walk to work. Seventeen percent of their workers walk to work. Also home to Alex Haley, the Roots author, and Vladimir Nabokov, the Lolita author, and most importantly, home to Frédéric Bouché and I’m the owner and a winemaker of lots of New York winery.

As you can probably guess, Frederic is from France. So just a little background on France. They produce 78 billion gallons of wine per year. And going back even further, the Catholic Church at one time was the largest vineyard owner in France. However, in 1860, France was plagued with wine maladies. They hadn’t quite perfected the making. And so they declared it a national crisis in 1860. So they called in Louis Pasteur. Yes, the same man who perfected pasteurization. And in 1866, his essay, Studies on Wine, became the foundation of modern winemaking. He had saved France’s wine industry. So that brings us up to Mr. Frédéric Bouché and his family history.

So it started with my great grandfather in 1919. And that was in France, in Normandy. So basically, my great grandfather told me he had vineyards in Baldo, which is yet another region, a true wine region. But he moved to Normandy in 1919 because his wife was from there. And when he moved there, he realized there was no wine, no more. Which was not a wine region? So he saw the opportunity and brought in some of the table wine, just to put it in kind of context.

How big is wine intertwined in their culture at that time?

So in Normandy, nobody drank wine or very few people because there was no access to it. So they were drinking hard cider. And you are still very complex. Hot cider, cold calbadot. And so he brought in the words and ignoring warnings from everywhere from France and then bottled them under his name, alanine, and then that’s what he would sell. So he was one of the very first people to sell French wine cellar to hotels and restaurants in the region.

They were loving this. They were there was a huge step up from cider to what he was producing. It was really high end because you could I mean, at that time, you could get the amazing wines for not much money and restaurants real. So were doing custom labels for sure. Restaurants. Wow. It’s quite amazing.  Yeah. You think about 1999, the technology and just what they were dealing with at the time.

You think. Oh yeah. I mean, we would print 50 labels, 40 or 50 different labels. That’s it. The designer there, you know, he was not a problem. There was some work done by hand. Small quantities were an issue. But at any rate, this winery ultimately did not turn out to be to survive because the laws changed drastically as far as the appellation from region to region. In fact, the idea of bringing wine, some older regions of France in you all look in the Stone Age, then bottle them under your own name is now completely illegal. We saw that going well before. I mean, the old appellation, like champagne and all that. So basically, although it was extremely successful until the mid-70s, it was clear I went there. I left in 1979. I went to study in Paris. And that at that point it was clear that there was no future.

So eventually it was sold in 1990. So it was sold in 1990. And then Frederick and his wife. What happened next? We’ll find out in part two in our conversation with Frédéric Bouché of Ports of Wine, New York. If you’d like to get a visual of what’s a winery is all about, go to portsofnewyork.com

Oh, yes. Now it is time for a listener voicemail question.

Does wine go bad? Why does it expire? But it strongly depends on its quality. If it’s a quality one, it can be stored even for 100 years. And after opening it will be of great quality. Well, thank you for your question. Sorry. It’s good to know that if you open up a bottle of wine, it could last up to one hundred years. I wish other things lasted that long.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best Five Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe until next time, pour the wine, and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.

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Volcano Winery – Volcano, HI Ep. 3 Pt. 2

Volcano Winery

Welcome to The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast. I’m your host Forrest Kelly from the seed to the glass. Wine has a past. Our aim at The Best 5 Minute Wine Podcast is to look for adventure at wineries around the globe. After all grape minds think alike. Let’s start the adventure. Our featured winery in this episode.

Our featured winery is Aloha, Volcano Winery.

As we continue our interview with Kendall of Volcano Winery in Volcano, Hawaii, in our first episode, we learned that a volcano winery is about 4000 feet high and is surrounded by volcanoes. And with that, it brings some special qualities to their appeal to what we call our Pinot Noir here on site. It’s considered one of our smaller batch wines. So it’s a little bit more exclusive compared to our house wines. And we take a lot of pride in our pinot noir. It’s very different from any other Pinot that I’ve personally tasted. It’s very light-bodied and super sulfuric and it’s got a lot of volcanic generality and cherry tart tones and subtle tannins. And it’s just very easy drinking. And it’s a hit with the community and from people all over the world because, you know, Pinot Noir is known for being a very temperamental grape. And there’s a lot of different regions in the world that are known for Pinot Noir. So it’s kind of fun to come over here and taste it. Hawaiian Grill and Pinot Noir Grape.

I read online were a Canadian couple came to the winery and I guess they bought more wine and it was allowed for them to get back into Canada with. So they had to make arrangements probably give it away or something. It was so good.

Man, that’s a bummer. Yeah. Yeah. We are a small production here. So when it comes to shipping back to other places, there are a lot of our customers. We do ship to the majority of the United States to ship to about 39 states in that shipping via alcohol license things and kind of matching them up with the other states. Unfortunately, we don’t ship to everybody and we don’t distribute. We only distribute within the Hawaiian Islands because you’re at 4000 feet. Is that an advantage or disadvantage if you’re here during our follow winter season and you’ll notice that the vines look a little sad. I don’t want to say that, but they’re actually dormant. So there’s no greenery. There are no grapes on the plant physically at this time during the fall and winter season. And that’s just because they’re kind of gearing up, getting ready for that spring and summer season when they will be flourishing and they’ll be green and they’ll be pumping out the great the grape plants. So it takes about eight years for the grape plant to produce fruit. Once it’s planted, once it’s producing fruit in order to produce a healthy grape. It has to go into a state of dormancy. And that’s pretty much for half a year in that dormancy is achieved by the plant being in a location that reaches temperatures below 40 degrees. And that temperature has to remain below 40 degrees consistent enough. So a majority of the day for come and maintain that dormancy.

That’s the trigger. Yet that’s the trigger that luckily that’s our biggest advantage of being at this elevation, allowing us to have those mountain winds in those cooler temperatures through the winter season, which in turn would have that natural dormancy for our grape. So that’s a big plus for us here.

Wow. Some good stuff with Volcano Winery in Volcano, Hawaii. Thank you, Kendall. If anybody wants to get a hold of you, obviously, how can they do that?

Not only can you give us a call anytime during our business hours roll. Happy to help you with any kind of questions or shipping or orders on the phone. We have (808) 967-7772. On our web site, you’ll have a list of all of our wines, all the states that we ship to. You’ll have descriptions of all the merchandise that we have available for shipping.

Now time for our listener voicemail. Let’s I’m going to find some listener voice here. Where did I put that?  “What I want out of each and every one of you is a hard-target search of every gas station, residents warehouse farmhouse here to our alpha dog house in that area.”  I’ve searched like Tommy Lee says, I should have found a listener voice mail from my Danny from Lomita, California. My question is, is buoying dryness or sweetness due to great variety?  Your cell phone cut out the middle there. Danny, could you repeat that for me? Oh, come on. Are you sure you can’t repeat it for me?

I believe, Danny, you said is a wine’s dryness or sweetness due to grape variety speaking with the experts. These tell me that just about any great variety can be made either dry or sweet or any stage in between that by stopping the fermenting process at a certain point. So the grape variety, it doesn’t matter.

Thank you for listening. I’m Forrest Kelly. This episode of the Best Five Minute Wine podcast was produced by IHSYM. If you like the show tell your friends and pets and subscribe until next time, pour the wine, and ponder your next adventure.

Please subscribe from your favorite Podcast Platform: Apple, Spotify, Google, Deezer, Stitcher, Tunein, Breaker, Castbox.